Educating the World

The past few weeks I have felt like a hamster on a wheel; running but getting nowhere fast.  I’m in the midst of my quarterly doctor and lab visits (2 more to go!), Vacation Bible School (VBS), a major writing project, a sick cat and prepping Braeden for endoscopy next week, all while trying to maintain some semblance of a home and the schedule that goes with being a family.  For those who think being a stay-at-home mom or working from home is easy, I dare you to try it for a week.  I can almost guarantee you’ll be running for the front door within a month, particularly if you really like that extra paycheck.

My choices in life (whether I’ve made them voluntarily or circumstances have dictated them) have generally involved me having to, at some point, educate the world.  When my husband and I chose to adopt internationally, we found ourselves educating people on the nuances of international adoption.  For those who aren’t familiar with our choice, here’s a brief history.  After 5+ years of unsuccessful infertility treatments, we chose to adopt.  The best choice for us was international adoption.  It wasn’t that we were opposed to adopting from the US.  It was simply because that God had decided that these two boys – one in Russia and one in Guatemala – needed us as parents, and we needed them to be our sons.  We traveled and had two of the most incredible experiences of our lives and continue to be blessed to watch our sons grow from infants into young men.  Even before the boys came home, we found ourselves educating our families and friends on international adoption, even as we were being educated ourselves.  Once they came home, the education continued.

While we are still asked about adoption, it’s less frequent, especially in the case of our oldest son who was born in Russia.  He looks like the all-American kid, especially when he wears his ever-present Reds baseball cap.  Our younger son is a different story.  Being from Guatemala, he does not “blend in” with the family.  Our immediate circle of family and friends don’t notice his gorgeous brown skin (I am insanely jealous of it) any longer, but others do.  Being Hispanic he will have to face prejudice.  We’d dealt with it once before, while he was in kindergarten at our homeschool co-op, but the parents of the other child were on board with educating their child.  The boys ended up being friends.

This week, I found myself in the position of “educating the world” again.  My normally happy-go-lucky son was the target of prejudice and bullying at VBS.  He stood up for himself and did all right things (told the kid to stop, talked to his crew leader), but it didn’t help.  After night #2, he talked it over with us.  After I calmed down, I requested a crew change and got it immediately.  However, I found myself in the situation of educating the world, when I had to reiterate the whole adoption and “not looking like me” idea.  Seriously, it’s 2014.  This is NOT a new concept.  Yet I did it, not for them, but for my son.  That’s what a momma does.  She advocates for her child in an effort to show them they aren’t strange or weird or anything else.  They are who they are and if people don’t like them, that’s their problem.

Once I cross that bridge, I get to educate the world about homeschooling.  Fortunately, I am not alone in this boat.  I have lots of friends who find themselves having similar conversations.  Actually, I tend to forget there’s a whole other world out there that goes to public or private school.  The boys often have to remind me of this when I ask why there are so many buses on the road.  Yet, I do end up explaining that this is what’s best for our family and, quite honestly, one of the things that kept me sane during chemo.  I had to get up and “do school” with the boys.  It was a reason to get out of bed and stay up.  It was one of the few times I was “normal” during those long months.  My kids have thrived in homeschool and I have discovered that Kyle does much better teaching himself and Braeden has a real talent for science so I can use these to my advantage when teaching them.  I’m not sure they’d be afforded the same opportunities elsewhere.

Of course, my biggest educating moments come with cancer.  Now that I look “normal” again (meaning my hair has grown out to shoulder length and I have color in my face), when I mention that I’m a cancer survivor people assume it was breast.  Then I explain it was ovarian.  Then I either get the look of “Why aren’t you dead?” or “When will you die?” as if ovarian cancer is a death sentence.  And for some women, it is.  If you’ve read this blog for any length of time, you know that I was extremely fortunate in that my cancer was found at stage 1.  I underwent 7 grueling rounds of chemotherapy that has given me side effects I wouldn’t wish on anyone.  I am faced with the lifetime of oncology visits, scans and blood work.  I found out last week that the infusion port that was used for my chemo is a permanent part of my anatomy until it needs to be replaced.  My veins are shot.  They were never very good, but the chemo took what little bit was good and ruined them.  Now I get to educate people on my port, why I have it, why I keep it, and all that jazz.  I have never rebounded energy wise.  Yes, I am on the cusp of 50, but it’s the new 30, right?

As I’ve said, ovarian cancer suvivorship is a tight knit club.  Most survivors face at least one more battle, whether it’s 2 years, 12 years or 20 years later.  You walk a tightrope of living life and glancing over your shoulder for the beast.  The scars don’t go away for any cancer survivor.  Unfortunately, most of my scars aren’t visible (I seriously doubt anyone would want to see my surgical scar given my current physical condition, which is a nice way of saying I don’t have a bikini body).  Let’s face it, no one wants to hear you complain after you’ve completed chemo.  You’re supposed to be “cured.”  You look good, why don’t you feel good?  I want to shake people and say “Because I had ovarian cancer you idiot!”  Instead I smile and try to explain that the very drugs that kill tumor cells have side effects which can last years.  I tell stories about chemo fog enhanced with menopausal forgetfulness.  If I’m really irritated, I launch into a highly scientific explanation of bone loss and nerve damage due to the heavy metals in carboplatin and the cell turnover in taxol. I tend to save that for only the truly irritating “experts” who read a lot, but have never had cancer.  It’s fun to watch them squirm.

I used to plan for everything, now not so much.  I look maybe a couple of months out, but that’s it.  My husband did get me to think about how we wanted to spend our 25th wedding anniversary in 5 years (we just made it to 20, but don’t ask me how).  We decided Hawaii might be nice.  I do have a plan.  I plan to have a bikini body and I know my scar will be on prominent display (hopefully it will just be the one).  This will be one time I won’t mind educating the world.  I figure being 54 and having a killer body is worth the hassle of having to educate the world.

Honestly, we’re all educators.  We’re all called to educate in our own special way; by our words, our actions and our choices.  Some of use just educate a bit more than others.

 

Advertisements

4 thoughts on “Educating the World

  1. Mom says:

    Bravo!! Well said my extrordionary child. I love you.

    Mom

  2. Cathy Bertke says:

    The little engine that ‘could’ has nothing on you. You are an amazing voice,especially for those who didn’t know what’s ahead in fighting the ‘beast’. Many prayers and good wishes to you and yours. Love, Cathy B.

  3. Peggie says:

    I always enjoy reading your blogs, Shelli. You are such a “prolific educator” and I pray that you always have the strength and spirit to stand up for what you believe. Your family will forever benefit from your lessons. Love, Peg

  4. Good luck balancing life.
    warmly, marcy
    http://livinglydying.com/

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s