Climbing out of the Pit

Hitting bottom is not fun. It hurts – badly. I don’t recommend body slamming unless you have the body of a superhero. When you hit bottom, you generally don’t flutter down softly like a feather, you hit it full force and there’s nothing to break the fall. If you’re like me, you land face down and get a mouthful of mud on top of the indignity of laying spread eagle at the bottom of a huge hole. It’s the end of a long line of bad things.

Sometimes, it’s easy to get out of the pit. The ground is spongy and you can get a decent jump to catapult yourself to a limb or other hold to pull yourself you. Or, if you’re like me, you just lie there. After all, there’s no place left to go. You’re all ready as low as you can go. Why tempt fate? Better to wallow in the pit with the worms and slime then to run the risk of sliding back despite your best attempts not to. And why not stay in the pit. Blood clots, liver biopsies, brain MRI’s, failed chemotherapy, all pushed me down further and further into a dark place that I felt like no one could reach. Not my children, my mom, my husband or even God. NO ONE. And I preferred it that way. At least, I wasn’t going to have any more issues.

I will admit, wallowing in the pit, while it can be strangely comforting, isn’t a good place to stay. Well, unless you like worms, slime and other creepy crawlies. Personally, I find them a bit, well, creepy. And while mud is supposed to be good for the complexion, I’ve never read any studies on the dental benefits of mud. So what’s a girl who’s been through the wringer to do?

Well, this girl didn’t do anything – at least at first. I stayed in that pit. It was safe, relatively speaking. Yes, it was slimy, and dank and definitely gloomy. But I knew I wasn’t going anywhere else. I was at rock bottom. Rock bottom isn’t a bad place to be. Hard, yes, but not necessarily bad.

I’d like to say I had an epiphany that got me moving out of the pit, but that would be a lie. It was more like my vivid imagination working overtime. I could see myself in the pit with these creatures dancing around the top of it. Think the Habersham Brothers from Horton Hears a Who. They were the evil monkeys who were going to roast Horton is Beezelnut oil (which I’m sure is loaded with trans fats). They reminded me of evil minions out to do Satan’s bidding. Unfortunately, I just can’t imagine Kevin, Stuart or Dave (the minions from Despicable Me being that evil, despite being actual minions.

So as the Habersham Brothers are doing their dance around the pit, who should appear but the Archangel Michael in all his glory. I will vouch for the fact that he is glorious. I can’t begin to imagine what the glory around the throne of the Almighty must be like. When Michael comes with this blazing sword and his angel army, you don’t lie in the pit and tell him you’re too tired, scared, or overwhelmed to move, you move. And if you don’t, he moves you. I was swept up on the wings of angels to the edge of the pit, with the Habersham Brothers standing their with their mouths open catching the flies coming up from the pit. Michael made it abundantly clear that I was now “off limits as a child of the Most High.” Suddenly, everyone was gone and I was alone, standing in the grass, and at peace.

If you’ve been reading my blog for long, you know that God has to hit me with a 2×4 to get my attention. An archangel with blazing swords qualifies. However, I never felt chastised by God for not being strong enough, or brave enough or faithful enough. Jesus sympathized with my plight. He reminded me that he was alone in the Garden, sweating blood, praying that he could avoid death. Then he was beaten, scorned and forced to carry his cross, only to be nailed to it as a common criminal. He was alone. Yes, his mom was there as was John, the beloved. They were there, but were unable to hold his hand or offer any comfort. In his last hours, even God left. My savior was ALONE, tired, scared and dying. He was separated from the Father, whom he’d been with forever. I cannot begin to fathom the depth of Jesus’ pit. I can’t even imagine being that alone.
Talk about dark, scary places.

This is why I am out of my pit. Not because Michael flew in and saved me, although I am eternally grateful to God’s angel army. No, it’s because Christ said, “I know what it’s like to be alone; to be scared and not know what’s going to happen next. I know the worst. It’s being separated from God. I promise you will never be separated. I know it feels like it, but you won’t. I am always here, even when you don’t think I am. I’m ALWAYS here.”

This doesn’t make facing cancer a walk in the park or have me thinking that life is all sunshine, lollipops and rainbows. It isn’t. It’s full of nausea, fatigue and too many trips to the Cancer Institute to count. It’s still looking at my kids and hoping I’ll see them graduate. It’s still striving to be the best wife, mom and daughter I can be despite feeling like crap. It’s deciding to have a positive attitude even when you feel like crap. I’m still convinced it’s for times like these that Ativan was invented. It gets rid of the nausea and if you don’t fall asleep, you don’t care. I think God’s okay with that for brief periods.

I am better able to focus on what’s important for today. Actually, I live my life in two week increments, starting on Wednesday. I get chemo on Wednesday, take a bunch of steroids and nausea meds on Thursday, go for fluids on Friday (and more meds for nausea) to get through the weekend of spending time with my family and attending worship, go to co-op on Monday and then get more fluids and nausea meds, rest of Tuesday (and attempt to catch up on school since I’ve been at the hospital), then get labs and MORE fluids and meds on Wednesday. Then I spend the next 7 glorious days at home, trying to drink enough fluid and having fun with my kids. I let the little things slide. They just don’t bug me. They aren’t important. On Wednesday it starts all over again. Life is slowly getting a rhythm. Not the one we want, but it’s still a rhythm.

It’s good to be alive, cancer or no cancer. I’d take life without cancer, but that’s in the cards right now. What is in the cards? A life that’s speaks to others. May my life speak as a blessing.

Note: I tolerated the new chemotherapy well. Cisplatin works best with Gemzar as was considered the gold standard for treatment 5 years ago and still is, but has horrible side effects. I would appreciate prayers that I don’t react to the cisplatin. I have high hopes of remission with this cocktail – shaken not stirred of course.

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2 thoughts on “Climbing out of the Pit

  1. Lynne says:

    Praising God for Michael lifting you from the pit and for your amazing testimony! Keeping you in my prayers.

  2. Lisa McAfee says:

    You are an inspiration to me, Shelli! I am praying for your healing and peace during this time.

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