Moving On

As we do most Sundays, we attended worship at Cornerstone Church.  Today was “step up” Sunday for the boys.  Braeden moved up to 2nd grade, his first year in elementary Sunday School without Kyle.  Kyle moved to our tween class, Club 56.  They have their own room and are situated away from both the lower elementary and the youth.  It was a big adjustment for both of them.  John and I are loving worship with our new pastor, Pastor Brian.  He reminds me of my youth pastor.  His sermons are relevant and entertaining, not an easy combination for pastors to master.

Tomorrow we begin our 6th year at KTA (Kitchen Table Academy), the affectionate name for our homeschool.  Since our learning occurs at the kitchen table, it’s given rise to the name.  I really should come up with something that will look better across the top of a diploma, but I haven’t stumbled on one yet.  I still have a couple of years.  I mean, can you seriously see UC accepting a transcript from Kitchen Table Academy?  I cannot believe Kyle is starting 5th grade.  With the exception of some stumbling over double and triple digit multiplication, my son is a practically a middle schooler.  Next year, he will be considered one at Learning Tree, our homeschool co-op.  What happened to that little bundle I brought home from Russia?  I finally understand the old saying, “The days are long, but the years are short.”

We are moving on this year in many ways.  We are starting new grades.  Mom is hoping to pick up more freelance work.  Both boys are playing sports again – Braeden’s soccer team won their first game yesterday and Kyle starts flag football practice Tuesday night.  John continues to hone his project management skills at Children’s.  We are beginning to move on.  Yet, I still get stuck.  In a few weeks, I have my CA125 drawn to track my tumor marker, have my 6 month CT scan and undergo yet another exam.  Yes, it’s preventative and given the results of my last CA125, I really don’t expect anything to show up.  Of course, I never expected to have cancer either.

Pastor Brian spoke about the bad times in life.  You know those times when life just knocks you for a loop and you can’t get back on your feet?  I’ve always known that when faced with struggles, I have two choices.  I can whine, moan and complain or I can face it head on.  Cancer makes you do a bit of both.  You have to face it head on.  It’s now your reality.  But I really don’t see how you can manage to make it through without whining, even if it’s just a little bit.  I chose to cling to God’s promise that even in my darkest hour, he wouldn’t leave me or forsake me.  He would lead me to those still waters and restore my soul.  Yes, I did have those times when I yelled at God, quite a few in fact.  My mentor, Pastor Linda Troy, once told me that God doesn’t care how much we yell at him.  It means we still believe in Him.

When I got the definitive diagnosis, I prayed like I’d never prayed for myself before.  I begged and pleaded with God to heal my body.  I visualized His healing hands.  I did it all right, but I still had a massive tumor on my ovary.  Funny thing is, if I had been healed of just my tumor I still would have had the nasty blood clot in my right leg.  It still would have probably broken off and, had I been anywhere but post-op, I probably would have died.  Hmmm.  Once I had the benefit of a couple of months of hindsight, I saw that.

That still leads me to why I had cancer.  Why couldn’t I have just had a massive benign tumor?  My oncologist told me that we will probably never know what triggered the cells to turn cancerous.  Even if we did know, it wouldn’t change anything.  I’d still would have had cancer.  Okay.  Here’s where choices really kick in.  Do you chose to wallow or do you choose to move on?  My friend Cathy told me I had to move on.  No choices.  I have 2 young sons and a husband.  While they were good reasons to move on, the only reason you can move on is because you feel like you have to.  God wants me to move on.  Granted, He let me have pity parties.  He gave me two wonderful friends who let me rant, rave and cry about how lousy I felt.  I will never, ever be able to repay Cathy or Lisa for listening to me when they had their own lives to live, but they both took the time to let me do what I needed to do.  Then I was able to move on.

Moving on means you accept you are not the same person you used to be.  Unfortunately, I will always have the “C” word in my background.   I feel a strong pull to work with ovarian cancer patients.  I’ve always been interested in healthcare and often write on healthcare topics.  Would I have found my niche without having ovarian cancer?  Maybe.  Did it affect me?  Definitely.  The person who entered Good Sam Hospital on October 17, 2012 is not the same one who left October 25, 2012.  Nor I am the same person who completed chemotherapy on March 15, 2013.  If we are open to things, God will continue to use our best and worst experiences to shape us.

So I need to be moving on now.  Life is about being an active participant, getting in and getting involved.  While cancer will always be a part of who I was, it doesn’t have to be a part of who I become.  And if it comes back. well, we’ll just move on with life and kick it back to where it belongs, in the past.  So we can get on with the future.  Moving on!

Advertisements

Dress Rehearsal

I have decided that my life before cancer was simply a dress rehearsal.  And I went through a lot of “stuff” before cancer. I think it’s the “stuff” that gives you the strength to fight cancer.  If you haven’t had a lot of “stuff,” you might not have the tools to really fight well.

When I graduated from college, all my friends were getting married so, of course, I wanted to get married too.  I hated being the third wheel.  Fortunately, one of my best friends got divorced during this time, but she ended up going to law school so I didn’t see her that often.  So I started dating a guy who was wrong for me on so many levels that I could write about it for YEARS and still not complete the explanation (my “sister” Sue can, however, give you the synopsis of why this guy was such a bad choice in 30 words or less).  If I hadn’t had that experience, I could never appreciate what a great guy I married.  And, despite his few flaws, he is absolutely perfect for me.  There is no way my ex-idiot, I mean fiancé, would have or could have stood by me through anything.

John and I have faced unemployment, financial distress, and infertility.  I’d have to say that the financial and infertility issues are a toss up.  Both are long term battles that suck you dry.  Both take an incredible commitment to stay together and work through it.  And both need to not place blame on the other.  We are stronger for being together through it.

Of course, infertility had its silver lining.  I have two incredibly handsome, funny, talented and amazing boys that lived in foreign countries that God gave us to raise.  Traveling to a foreign country is not for the faint of heart.  Three weeks in Russia, while amazing, took its toll on us.  And after two failed adoption attempts, the four days in Guatemala, while incredible, were hard on Kyle and my mom, especially since my dad had only been gone 5 months when we left and we were all acutely aware that Braeden would never get to meet his Papaw.  Reflecting back, however, John and I have decided that Braeden has, in fact, met his Papaw as he seems to be channeling him in a regular basis now.  They are random comments that my dad would have made and I marvel at how Braeden gets his wish to “meet” his grandpa.

Losing both our fathers within 3 years gave both of us a glimpse of the struggle at the end of life.  We put our intentions in place and have medical power of attorney’s and living wills.  And in 2012, we both had to have the talk about “if something happens to me, you WILL honor my wishes.”  John faced a potentially life threatening neurological incident that turned out to be something congenital.  It was, to that point, the roughest 6 weeks of my life.  While I had faced the death of my father and father-in-law, I never expected to face the prospect of being a widow at 47.  I am proud of the way John handled the entire experience (me, not so much.  I was pretty selfish with my prayers).  And it helped us learn why John’s short term memory is not as sharp as we thought it should be. 

Six weeks after that, the mass was found on my left ovary.  I KNEW it was cancer and even told John.  I hadn’t had any tests yet, but I just knew.  Being the incredible husband he is, he went through the entire spiel about not knowing anything and it’s probably nothing since that’s what the doctor says, yada, yada, yada.  But I knew.  Six weeks later, after nearly dying after surgery, I had to tell my husband I had cancer.  He missed the doctor because he had to take the kids to our homeschool co-op that day and was a little late.  I don’t think I will EVER forget the look on his face.  I don’t even know how to describe it.  For a brief moment, I had to be the strong one while he had to face the prospect of a life without a wife.  When I think back on this, I cry.  We’d had so many rugs pulled out from under us and landed on our feet.  This time, we landed smack on our butts and it hurt.

Once I was home, we laid out our action plan.  I would go to chemo and he would work something out with his boss so he could be with me.  We embarked on the longest, hardest journey of our lives and marriage – chemotherapy.  Lots of couples divorce during cancer treatment.  Spouses can’t handle it.  My husband shaved my head, cleaned the house, took care of the kids, held me when I cried and kept his vow of “for better or for worse” and “in sickness and in health.”  We definitely had the worse and sickness thing nailed during those 5 months.

Looking back, neither one of us could have come out on the other side of my battle without having been through all those smaller battles that seemed insurmountable at the time.  Had I not battled infertility and being told “No you can’t have children,” would I have developed the determination to fight and prove my doctors wrong.  Had I not dated an idiot, I would not have had to fortitude to know how to advocate for myself.  Had I not had the experience of losing my dad, I would not have learned how to fight.  Being a mom gave me the will to fight for my kids.  Being married gave me a partner to join me in battle.  Being a daughter of the one true King gave the hope that it was all in His hands.

My life to that point was a dress rehearsal for survival.  This experience has added another dimension to who I am.  Just like the experiences prior to this, ovarian cancer does not define me, but it helps shape the person I am becoming. 

No one jumps up and down and begs for cancer (if they do, they are truly more idiotic than my ex).  It happens, just like that stuff in the other more common phrase.  It’s a monster that takes far too many warriors in the battle for life.  I am thankful that I get to fight another day – every day.  Perhaps that’s the lesson from this battle.  Life makes you a better person.  You can face it head on or let it run over you.  My dress rehearsal taught me to always face life head on.  I wonder what challenges are next?